The appeal of quirky news

Tomorrow's Business

It’s a monster reporting week. Scores of big companies have results, or at least updates and they all need looking at closely.

There are the banks for a start, beyond that, there’s big oil, big tech and big everything else. On Thursday alone 25 of the biggest names in world business are scheduled to talk.

If you’re a flak outside this process it’s understandable to think there’s not much point in trying to compete with all of this.

Understandable, but not quite right I don’t think.

By definition, this big news will be everywhere. Reporters will be looking for individual angles, but the announcements will be standard, and the business press will feel duty bound to report as many of them as possible.

Weeks like this create a slightly heavy feeling among hacks. For a start, it is hard work. And secondly we’re aware that we are in danger of becoming stenographer’s, editing down windy statements into digestible chunks.

That’s the opportunity I think. Quirky news might play well simply because it is such a diversion from everything else.

Something that isn’t “big company loses £300m, warns on future”, will attract the attention of editors.

Contact the Tomorrow's Business team news@tomorrowsbusiness.co