Home Tomorrow's Business The rise of the “don’t quote me” flak

The rise of the “don’t quote me” flak

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Flaks being desperate not to be quoted is fairly standard.

We’re off the record, so we might, if agreed, quote a “source close to the process”, or a “City watcher familiar with the situation”.

That’s fair enough, mostly.

There’s a new development. Or, at least, an old development that is growing in popularity.

It is the on-the-record statement that the flak is desperate, is begging, to ensure that her name is nowhere near.

Now, maybe this is just natural shyness. Flaks mostly prefer to operate in the background and in general that works fine all round.

On contentious stories, ones where there’s a hint of skulduggery, it does seem to us hacks that someone’s name ought to be attached to the statement, no matter how bland it may be.

The please don’t put my name in the story flak is giving the very definite impression that even she thinks her clients are lying.

That’s time to resign the account, no?

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