Rosie's Week

RoxStars

There’s a theory that a celebrity’s personal development stops the moment they become mega famous. So if you’re working with a star who crashed into the limelight Bieber young (13), then watch out.

You’ll be dealing with teenage levels of attention span, personal hygiene and emotional intelligence.

I always say my time on shoots prepared me for becoming a parent. I was constantly rallying talent who were variously too hot, too hangry, in need of a bathroom break or suffering from a mysterious illness. Pleading with them not to spend too much in the gift shop, checking they had a drink and their passport and knew when their flight was. All part of my job.

I probably don’t have to tell you lot this. I’m sure you’ve had your fair share of coaxing (okay pleading) with celeb ambassadors to get onto a stage (pretty galling when they are being paid more than your yearly salary for a half hour Q & A).

I guess at its heart it’s all about power imbalance right? Celebs make us hacks feel small when they roll their eyes at the ‘obvious line’ of questioning.The elephant in the room is they are being paid millions to promote the aftershave/chewing club/razor and we’re not here because of one indie film that four people (of which one was their mum) saw, but instead because of their sensational love life. But still, we can’t risk saying that and going back empty handed, so we cajole and flatter till we get the quote.

Yet I’m aware, after a lifetime of being courted by brands I can/could/do fall into the pampered, over indulged bracket.

Truth is it’s easy to become an asshole as a journalist.

Recently I was shocked to see a journalist had texted a PR friend IN CAPS wanting to know why she was not invited to a party she could see unfurling on Instagram.

And once it was explained she was down to attend another event, there was no thank you, no response.

No excuse.

And to that famous actress who was 24 hours late for an interview. Not okay either.


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